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The What, When, Why – Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 are two common bankruptcy programs available to individuals to discharge their debts. If you ever got confused between the two, here is a quick what, when, and why to help you learn their differences.

What is Chapter 7 Bankruptcy?

Chapter 7 bankruptcy is a liquidation bankruptcy. Your non-exempt assets are sold by the court trustee to repay your creditors.

When is Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Needed?

When your debt becomes completely unmanageable, and you want a quick discharge to restart your financial life.

Why is Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Important?

It helps eliminate the risk of debt trap that, otherwise, individuals could fall into if they can’t keep up with the repayments.

What is Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

Chapter 7 bankruptcy is a reorganization bankruptcy. Rather than a discharge, your repayment schedule is reorganized based on what you can actually pay.

When is Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Needed?

When you are struggling to repay your debt but don’t want to risk losing any of your assets.

Why is Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Important?

It allows you to prevent foreclosure or selling off of your assets by creditors by making repayment more manageable.

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Planning for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy – 5 Quick & Helpful Tips

1. Any debt incurred after the bankruptcy filing date does not qualify as part of your discharge. Therefore, it is best to file when one is sure that they are reasonably sure that they won’t be incurring any further unmanageable expenses while during and after the bankruptcy process.

2. Include all qualifiable debts that you believe you won’t manage in your bankruptcy. Once a discharge is given, most debtors have to wait 8 years before qualifying for another debt discharge.

3. If you are moving to another state, time your bankruptcy filing accordingly. Depending on which state you are in and to which you are moving, it may be more advantageous to file while residing in the one with more generous exemption laws.

4. Be mindful of making large payments to preferred creditors, selling assets, or transferring them out of your name shortly before bankruptcy. It can raise suspicion of bankruptcy fraud, and the court trustee assigned to your case can get the money or property back using a clawback provision.

5. Don’t make the mistake of incurring any further debt shortly before filing for bankruptcy. The fact that you purchased items on credit knowing that you won’t pay the creditor back can make you subject to fraud allegations. Even if it does not result in a criminal investigation, the outcome could still be an objection to your discharge.

#chapter7 #bankruptcy #legaltips #bankruptcyadvice #bankrutcyUS #TX #helpfultips #USLaw

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