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Credit Repair

Bankruptcy May Actually Help Your Credit Score

Meta Title: Bankruptcy May Actually Help Your Credit Score

Meta Description: Wondering how filing for bankruptcy could help your credit score? You’d be surprised!

Keywords: Filing for bankruptcy, credit score

Bankruptcy May Actually Help Your Credit Score

Bankruptcy laws were formed to help relieve you from creditors by giving you a fresh start to your finances. While there is no denying that this fresh start comes at the cost of a significant hit to your credit, bankruptcy does have some good long- and short-term effects on your credit.

Depending on your credit score, assets, and current financial situation, you can benefit from bankruptcy.

What is a Credit Score?

To put it simply, a credit score is a number that portrays your credit history and decides whether or not you will falter on a debt. Lenders view this score whenever you ask for debt so that they can decide whether or not they want to give you a loan and what interest rate they want to charge.

The most common type of credit score is FICO scores. These can fall anywhere between 300 to 850. A FICO score depends on the information present in your credit report. This includes:

  • Your history of debt repayment
  • The debt you currently have lined up, including your debt-to-credit ratio
  • Different types of credit that you might have obtained
  • The amount of time you have had credit for
  • Whether or not you have new credit that needs to be paid.

A high FICO score is an indication that you are good at managing your finances. However, a subpar FICO score shows that you are negligent with your credit payments, have a number of unpaid debts in line, have recently gone through a foreclosure, have filed for bankruptcy, or experienced other issues in the process of repaying debt.

How Filing for Bankruptcy May Help Your Credit Score

Getting Rid of Delinquent Accounts

There’s nothing worse than making late payments, as these will wreck your credit score. However, filing for bankruptcy will help remove a large percentage of the delinquent accounts that you may have on your credit report.

This means that once you discharge these debts, they do not read as delinquent on your credit report. Instead, they appear as “discharged.”

Changing the Debt-to-Credit Ratio

An individual’s debt-to-income ratio is regularly considered by credit bureaus. This is why if you have more debt as compared to the amount you earn, your credit score will most likely be low.

However, if you manage to remove some of your debt by filing for bankruptcy, your income will stay the same, and your creditworthiness has good chances of improving.

Allow Yourself to Start Fresh

Debt can be crippling. It can make people feel trapped and suffocated, especially if your debt has reached an unmanageable amount, and your income does not match anywhere close to it. During these times, instead of letting yourself drown in hopelessness, it is essential to realize that filing for bankruptcy may actually give you a fresh start.

Once you get a fresh start, you can start regulating your spending and pay close attention to finding ways to improve your credit score.

By taking advantage of bankruptcy protection in your city, you may start to notice an improvement in your credit score. To find out more about Chapter 7 and Chapter 11 bankruptcy, click here (insert link of the website).

Your Student Loan Debt CAN be Discharged Through Bankruptcy

There has been long a perpetuating myth that student loan debt in America cannot be wiped out by declaring bankruptcy. The truth is quite the opposite. A court can grant you a discharge provided you can prove it is causing you ‘undue hardship’.

Courts will use different tests to evaluate whether it might be causing you undue hardship. The commonly used is the Brunner test. Passing it requires you to prove that:

1. You and your dependents are unable to maintain the ‘minimal’ standard of living because of the debt

2. Additional circumstances exist that will make such a state of affairs to persist for a long period

3. You had made real effort to repay your student loan debt.

On the surface, this does make it seem that qualifying for a discharge might be difficult, but an empirical student from Villanova University found that judges have granted a hardship discharge to 40% of debtors who sought one.

In such a context, it may be surprising to find that 99.9% of debtors who have filed for bankruptcy don’t even attempt to discharge their student loans. With more and more individuals suffering from mounting student loan debt, it remains highly critical to raise awareness about how it could potentially be wiped out.

Link to the study: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1894445

#bankruptcy #chapter13 #chapter7 #studentloans

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Steps to Take When You Are Sued by A Creditor

Whether you have a bank loan, a credit card loan, or even an unpaid medical bill, living with excessive debt can be risky. While we all have taken some debt at a given moment, it is necessary to keep track of everything that you owe.

If not, you might find yourself in a difficult situation where your creditor ends up suing you. While you should try your best to avoid such problems, you should also be aware of how to respond to a creditor lawsuit if it ever happens.

You would be surprised to know that a good majority of civil cases that the court addresses are debt cases. If you have received a letter for the same, you should follow these steps to resolve the issue:

Do Not Panic

While it sounds pretty basic, not panicking in such situations is extremely significant. As stated above, these cases are common, and if you have an unattended debt, there is a high chance that your lender will use this way to get their money back. However, if you are not in the right state of mind, you can make things even more difficult for yourself.

Do Not Ignore

Another thing that goes hand in hand with the above point is to respond to the situation. Yes, staying calm is important but that in no way means that you sit back and relax while ignoring the matter altogether.

If a creditor has filed a lawsuit against you, it means that things are pretty serious, and you need to be there to respond to it.

Additionally, you need to take court seriously and be present. Because if you miss court hearings, the final decision will ultimately be in favor of your creditor. Hence, you will lose any opportunity for negotiation.

Be Cautious

If you follow the above two steps, it will become easier for you to take things smoothly. You probably have a debt that has gone unattended for an extended period because of which the creditor had no option but to sue you.

However, this doesn’t mean that you should agree to everything that has been stated against you. Since filing a lawsuit is additional work and money for the creditor, they may include extra charges or interest in the overall cost.

Hence, be very cautious and not take liability for everything right away. However, you will need proper documentation for being in this position, which brings us to our next point.

Documentation

Documentation does not only mean asking the creditor to give you a copy of your complete account statement or other such documents. It also includes all your receipts, salary records, bills, and any other essential documents that may prove helpful in the future.

You may only need all of this if the case involves a debt that you are not in a position to attend. However, you should still keep everything to be on the safe side.

Talk to a Lawyer

Lastly, even if you think that your case is not too serious, you should at least consult a lawyer. This way, you will know the possible outcomes and be better prepared to handle the case. However, if the debt is enormous and you have no way of paying the amount back, you will probably need an attorney by your side.

For more information, speak with an experienced bankruptcy attorney – schedule your free 1-hour consultation today: https://seanflynnlaw.com/calendar/

4 Quick Tips to Regaining Your Financial Health After Bankruptcy

A bankruptcy discharge can definitely hurt your credit score, but nonetheless, without the burden of your past debts, you can find it much easier to regain your financial health.

1. Plan a Budget

Budget planning is central to effective money management. On a spreadsheet or with the use of an online app, make a note of all your expenses, categorizing them on whether they are ‘essential’ or ‘non-essential.’

If the sum of your monthly income and expenses just break even or is in the negative, consider cutting on non-essential expenses until you can generate some savings.

2. Use Cash

Prioritizing cash spending can help you save money by limiting the amount you can spend at any time. With credit, it can be easy to indulge in excess spending, but while using cash, there is only so much you can buy before it runs out.

3. Set an Auto-Payment System

Regaining a good credit score means never missing the deadline on many repayments. However, with so much going on in our lives, it can be actually much harder than it seems. Fortunately, most financial agencies allow you to set up an auto-pay system to avoid any unintentionally missed payments.

4. Add Positive Accounts to Your Credit History

Provided they qualify, consider adding positive accounts to your credit history, such as your utility and phone bills, to improve your credit report. This can be especially helpful for those with little or no credit score.

#bankrutcy #finance #Chapter7 #tips

Payday Loans and Bankruptcy

Payday loans, also commonly known as cash advances, check advances, or paycheck advances, may seem like an appealing option to those falling behind on their bills. However, when people start to rely heavily on payday loans, they can get stuck in a pattern and end up filing for bankruptcy.

What is a Payday Loan?

A payday loan described as a short-term, high-cost loan that is generally for $500 or less. These act as a cushion to your immediate cash needs and need to be paid back within two weeks or close to your payday.

Since payday loans charge triple-digit annual percentage rates (APRs), they can be a burden to repay. In fact, if you’re not mindful, you may end up going overboard, and these negligent payday loans may end up costing you a lot more.

Can Payday Loans Be Discharged When Filing for Bankruptcy?

Payday loans are known as “unsecured debt.” This is because they do not entail any property as collateral in case of failure to pay. Unsecured debt is eligible to be discharged when someone files for Chapter 7 bankruptcy. It can also be added in the court structured repayment plan if filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Through this, the debtor is allowed to repay the loan over time at his/her convenience.

Hardship provision is an option given when filing for bankruptcy. This means that the debtor can remove all or a portion of these debts, according to his personal situation. This can be decided and determined by the bankruptcy attorney based on being unable to complete the repayment plan.

Sometimes, lenders will subtly include a disclaimer in your paperwork, which states that the debt cannot be foregone despite bankruptcy. However, you don’t need to worry; these disclaimers have no place in the court of law. Along with unsecured loans, cash advances and payday loans can be fully discharged in a bankruptcy proceeding.

Loans That Cannot Be Discharged in Bankruptcy Proceedings

The point of declaring bankruptcy is to achieve a fresh start rather than skirting creditors with the intention of never repaying their money. To ensure this, bankruptcy courts state that any debt or loan taken within 60-90 days before filing for bankruptcy cannot be discharged.

Things to Pay Attention To

It is usual for some payday loans to be renewed automatically every month till full payment is received. Lenders might try to twist this in the bankruptcy court to show that the loan is newer than 60 days. However, in such cases, your bankruptcy attorney can make the court aware of the loan’s initial date. This will help the court refer to the date you obtained the loan and rule in your favor.

In case a lender has a post-dated check for an amount that is out of your current budget, make a quick trip to the bank, pay a small fee, and get payment stopped on that check. This will relieve you of additional stress in bankruptcy court.

For more information, speak with an experienced bankruptcy attorney – schedule your free 1-hour consultation today: https://seanflynnlaw.com/calendar/

How to Handle a Debt Collection Lawsuit

Constant calls, emails, or lawsuits from debt collectors may stress you out, putting you in a frenzy, but they are more common than you know. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau states that over 70 million Americans have faced debt collectors at some point in their lives, while approximately 25 percent have felt threatened in their dealings.

Debt collection lawsuits are something people do not like to deal with. The type of language used in collection agencies is enough to ignite fear and panic in individuals. After all, when you are served with a lawsuit, and your wages, bank accounts, and assets are under threat, it is natural to become overwhelmed.

This blog will list down the steps you can take to defend yourself or your company against a debt lawsuit to help you stay composed and collected when served papers for debt. First things first- understand your rights.

Respond to the Lawsuit

If you get served a lawsuit or debt claim, the first thing you need to do is respond to it. Failing to respond in a timely manner results in notices arriving in the form of summons and complaints.

If you owe some debt but can’t afford to pay it, you still need to respond otherwise, the collection agency will form a default judgment against you. Then, they might collect their money through wage garnishments or from your bank account.

Challenge the Collection’s Company Right to Sue

You can respond to a lawsuit by challenging the plaintiff’s right to file the lawsuit. Mostly, when a debt reaches this stage, it has already been sold. This means that person who owns the debt is legally required to prove that they have the right to file a lawsuit. Once served, the burden of proof rests with the plaintiff. This means that the person suing you has to prove that you are solely responsible for the debt, that they can legally sue you, and that you owe a specific amount.

To prove that you owe a specific amount, the collection agency needs to show proof of your balance increasing when you made purchases and that your current balance is accurate and accounts for every dollar you have spent.

However, if you choose not to respond, the court will assume that your silence means that you take responsibility for the debt.

Hire Your Own Attorney

If you cannot afford to pay back the debt, incurring further legal expense is not attractive. However, once you consult your attorney, you will be made more aware of your options and have a higher chance of defending yourself against the debt collection lawsuit.

Sometimes, all you need is a third-party to help you see things from a different situation and pick out key elements you might have missed out and could use to your advantage.

File for Bankruptcy

If you cannot pay back the debt, bankruptcy might be the only option. When you file for bankruptcy, an automatic stay is ordered. This means that all debt collection activity must cease until the bankruptcy process is handled.

For more information, speak with an experienced bankruptcy attorney – schedule your free 1-hour consultation today: https://seanflynnlaw.com/calendar/

Have You Ever Wondered Who Pays for Bankruptcies?

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If you are a debtor who is out of options and is now thinking of going bankrupt, it might be the right way to go for you. However, if you are an investor, a personal creditor, either secured or unsecured, the situation for you will be very different if one of your debtors goes bankrupt. This is why it is significant to understand how bankruptcies work no matter which boat you are in.

When you start understanding the legal procedures, the first thing that may come to your mind would be as to who really pays for bankruptcies? This question is completely valid. However, the answer is much trickier and complex than you might think. The rationale behind it is that bankruptcy is not a simple process with just one situation that can occur. There are different processes, involving different kinds of bankruptcies, which eventually results in different solutions to cover the costs of different loans that you have.

The basic difference in payment methods results from two different types of bankruptcies, i.e. chapter 7 and 13 bankruptcies. Chapter 7 is applicable when it can be proved that you cannot pay any of your loan at all and so all your assets are taken away to pay back your debts. This type is also called straight bankruptcy, although, there are still several complications in this as well.

Chapter 13, which is also referred to as reorganization, is a plan where the court revisits your payment plan and make changes according to your monthly income. This way, you get at least 3-5 years to pay off some part of your debt and see if there still exists a need of going completely bankrupt. One thing that you need to keep in mind is that both of these are still types of bankruptcies and so if you opt for them, you will have it on your credit for 10 years!

What if All Your Assets are not Enough to Pay Off Your Debts?

This is often the case when big companies go bankrupt. This is why corporate bankruptcy is the most harmful one. However, there is a process through which the court divides the amount recovered. This is done under section 507 of the code which states the hierarchy through which the amount is divided and who is given priority. The priority is always given to secured creditors, after which unsecured creditors are in line, which may include employees and lastly if there is still some recovered amount left, stockholders are entertained. Although, reaching that stage is a rare thing and so unless everyone else is covered, stockholders get nothing!

Even apart from companies, when we are talking about personal bankruptcy when the cost cannot be completely recovered and the money is not paid completely to the creditors, they have to find different, more indirect ways of retrieving that amount. Some personal investors increase their interest rates, while sellers have to increase the profit amount so that they can cover at least some of their losses!

Whether you are a debtor or a creditor, it is always necessary to get legal advice beforehand, to understand these critical processes in an easier way!

For more information, speak with an experienced bankruptcy attorney – schedule your free 1-hour consultation today: https://seanflynnlaw.com/calendar/

Planning for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy – 5 Quick & Helpful Tips

1. Any debt incurred after the bankruptcy filing date does not qualify as part of your discharge. Therefore, it is best to file when one is sure that they are reasonably sure that they won’t be incurring any further unmanageable expenses while during and after the bankruptcy process.

2. Include all qualifiable debts that you believe you won’t manage in your bankruptcy. Once a discharge is given, most debtors have to wait 8 years before qualifying for another debt discharge.

3. If you are moving to another state, time your bankruptcy filing accordingly. Depending on which state you are in and to which you are moving, it may be more advantageous to file while residing in the one with more generous exemption laws.

4. Be mindful of making large payments to preferred creditors, selling assets, or transferring them out of your name shortly before bankruptcy. It can raise suspicion of bankruptcy fraud, and the court trustee assigned to your case can get the money or property back using a clawback provision.

5. Don’t make the mistake of incurring any further debt shortly before filing for bankruptcy. The fact that you purchased items on credit knowing that you won’t pay the creditor back can make you subject to fraud allegations. Even if it does not result in a criminal investigation, the outcome could still be an objection to your discharge.

#chapter7 #bankruptcy #legaltips #bankruptcyadvice #bankrutcyUS #TX #helpfultips #USLaw

—-Your Common #Bankruptcy Questions Quickly Answered—-

—-Your Common #Bankruptcy Questions Quickly Answered—-

1. Will I lose my house in Chapter 7 Bankruptcy?

In most cases, your house will most likely be exempted from being sold off in a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy case.

2. Can Bankruptcy take my social security?

As per Federal Law, your social security funds are exempt and thus protected in bankruptcy.

3. I am currently unemployed. Can I still file for bankruptcy?

Yes, your employment status does not bar you from filing for bankruptcy. It will, however, impact the chances of a successful outcome in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

4. Can my student loans be eligible for a bankruptcy discharge?

In most cases, your student loans are not eligible for a discharge under either Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. However, it can be wiped out if you can prove that it is causing you undue hardship.

5. I make a lot of money. Do I still qualify for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy?

If your household income exceeds that of your state median, you may still qualify depending on how much are your monthly deductible expenses (e.g., childcare, taxes, debt repayments, utility, and food).

6. Do married couples both have to file for Bankruptcy?

Both you and your partner can file for bankruptcy individually or jointly. Depending on your debt situation and the state you reside in, either of the options could be more beneficial.

7. Will Bankruptcy affect my employment?

No employer will lay you off solely because of your bankruptcy, nor does it, in most cases, impact your employment prospects.

#bankruptcy #US #FAQs #Chapter7 #Chapter13

Renting an Apartment and Bankruptcy

You may believe that finding an apartment in Texas after filing for bankruptcy is close to impossible, but we’re here to help you achieve that dream. Landlords may be wary of the negative mark on your credit history, and everything will seem to go downhill from there.

However, it is entirely possible, albeit challenging, to rent an apartment after declaring bankruptcy. Below is a guide to help you through the application process to ensure you get approved for a lease- the hardest part:

Have an Open Communication

Lying to potential landlords about your bankruptcy is a terrible idea. Most of them will find out regardless when they run your credit history during your application process. Instead, having an open dialogue with them about the circumstances that led up to your bankruptcy, followed by what you have done since to counter it, such as a steady job or income, can help your case.

Proving your innocence and determination to do better is the key- once you convince the landlord to place his trust in you, you are more likely to get through the application process. If not, be proud of yourself for being truthful. Chances are that the landlord appreciated your frankness.

Pick Landlords Wisely

Keep in mind that different landlords have different policies for leasing their properties. Your best bet would be to rent from a private property owner, rather than a complex. They are more understanding and flexible with personal history.

With a bit of research, you might even be able to find an area with a “no credit check” policy. Renting an apartment near a college or university campus may be another factor you could look into. Landlords there have a history of catering to students who have a credit history, so they might be willing to adjust their policies for you too.

Provide Proof of Consistency

Everything aside, all that matters is that you pay your rent on time each month. If you can convince your landlord that you are consistent and reliable, you will have more chance of getting that lease.

If possible, provide your landlord with bank statements or previous rental history to prove that you are a grounded tenant who won’t give him a hard time. Another thing you could do is provide a larger security deposit that will cover the rent for the next few months’. While this could be challenging if you’ve recently come out of bankruptcy, it will make your landlord trust you more.

Find People Who Will Substantiate Your Claims

Most landlords will feel at ease if you can provide some reference to prove your honesty and integrity. These references could be your past or present employers, previous landlords, past roommates, or even some personal references. As long as you have a good standing with the people you refer to your landlord, all is well.

If all else fails, finding someone with good credit to co-sign the rental application will also help make an airtight case. This way, your landlord will (on paper) have someone to take the responsibility of clearing the dues in case you fail to do so.

For more information, speak with an experienced bankruptcy attorney – schedule your free 1-hour consultation today: https://seanflynnlaw.com/calendar/

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