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What Should You Expect at a 341 Meeting?

A 341 Meeting, also known as a Meeting of Creditors, may sound unnerving for first-timers. However, the process itself is fairly routine and quick. In the meeting, an appointed trustee will oversee your case, confirm your identity, and proceed to ask a series of questions about your bankruptcy paperwork. Here in this article, we give a detailed overview of what to expect at a 341 meeting.

Preparing for the Meeting

Before going to the meeting, make sure to double-check your bankruptcy petition in case you missed something. You should have all the information provided exactly as it, and as accurate as possible (e.g., the value of your assets, your name as it appears on your government issued ID, etc.). The trustee will be looking at the information you provided, and will check for any signs of misleading information or fraud.

What to Bring

The list of documents you need to bring along for the hearing is short. Typically, you are required only to bring along an approved photo I.D, your Social Security card, and any documents that reflect a financial change since you filed the petition.

The Hearing

Most 341 hearings last no more than 10 minutes. During the hearing, the trustee will ask you a series of routine questions which only demand a simple answer from you. Afterward, they may then proceed to ask questions more specific to your case. Creditors might also be present to ask questions about your finances. Although such cases are rare and most of the time, creditors won’t be present at the 341 meetings.

Some Typical Questions They May Ask

Below are some typical questions a trustee may ask during a hearing. However, different cases may involve a different set of questions, and thus, it always a good idea to check with an attorney before your scheduled 341 meeting.

  1. To the best of your knowledge, is all of the information provided in your bankruptcy papers correct?
  2. Did you recheck your bankruptcy petition and schedules before filing with the court?
  3. Have you listed all of your creditors in the petition?
  4. Have you disclosed all of your assets?
  5. Have you ever declared bankruptcy before?
  6. Did anything change since you filed for bankruptcy?
  7. Have you filed all your due tax returns?
  8. Do you have any domestic support obligations such as alimony or child support?
  9. In the last year, have you made any payments to creditors exceeding a total of $600?

Consider hiring an Attorney.

An attorney can help you better prepare for your 341 meeting by finding and fixing any honest mistake or inaccuracy that may be in your bankruptcy paperwork. Presenting accurate and complete information to the trustee is important, otherwise they may ask you to re-file an updated petition or worse, in case they mistakenly view the information you provided as fraudulent, alert the court. For a free consultation with a seasoned attorney, book an appointment online or call at 512-640-3340.

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